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Environmental Health and Safety Blog | EHSWire

Mid-Year Regulatory Submission Reminder

Posted by Emilcott Associates

Mar 29, 2016 3:45:38 PM

Just as we all take a deep breath after getting the CRTK submissions on March 1 --- now it is time to get started pulling together the information for the next round of submissions.  We’ve pulled together our Spring and Summer submission list.  Similar to our 1Q2016 Regulatory Submission Reminder, we detail information about the regulations that require submissions from mid-April through September 2016 along with specific dates to help you ensure that everything is submitted on time! 

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Topics: OSHA, EPA, TSCA, regulations, regulation, regulatory

EPA TSCA Regulatory Update: A Preview of the CDR Form U Submission Tool

Posted by Shivi Kakar

Oct 18, 2011 11:02:45 PM

aula Kaufman, CIH
If you are a foreign or domestic business in the US who is either a chemical importer (resells for use in blending, repackaging) or chemical manufacturer (make new chemicals out of chemicals purchased from others with the exception for pharmaceutical companies), this update is about mandatory compliance with the EPA’s Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), specifically filing the 2012 TSCA Form U “Chemical Data Report”.

Emilcott recently participated in an industry preview (the unveiling!) of the e-CDRweb tool.  Based on this peek, we are optimistic that the tool will be functional and surmountable IF all the required information is gathered together prior to preparing the submission.  As a test run, we entered simulated data and found the online tool to be logical and the built-in validation system should assist submitters with identifying inconsistent or incomplete entries.

Our conclusion: The difficulty will most likely not be the use of the e-CDRweb tool, the greater challenge will be the effort and time required to gather the right data needed for the submission.

Our advice: START GATHERING THE REQUIRED DATA NOW!!

Start with the following 2010 and 2011 inventory and volume data:

  • Review the Form U data needed, consider the time you will need to obtain these data, and then allow additional time for getting follow-up, incomplete or missing information.

  • Determine Co-Submitters for chemicals that are toll manufactured.

  • Get the CAS number for all chemicals at or above the 25,000 lb threshold. Prescient warning:  the need to submit a CAS number or accession number for each chemical may require significant effort and time for submitters with suppliers that list “confidential” for the component.

    • Define which suppliers will need to be joint submitters.

    • Discuss and agree upon this with the supplier.




Get the CDX registration and authorizations completed… a multi-step, multi-party and possibly lengthy process.

  • CDX registration for e-CDRweb will be available on November 1, 2011.

  • Primary Authorized Official must be registered first as this activates the account.

    • Designate the Primary Support



  • Establish the Secondary Authorized Officials (joint submitters) by chemical substance


In summary, if you were to compare filing the EPA’s TSCA submission to the IRS’s income tax form, the e-CDRweb tool is definitely going to be easier. However, understanding what to get and where to get it and then digging up the required information for the TSCA submission is going to be challenge.

If you need guidance with what data you should for the EPA TSCA 2012 CDR Submission, please contact Emilcott!

You can also subscribe to our free TSCA e-newsletter which delivers information right to your mailbox. Want more info? Enroll for our free Dec webinar by sending an email to pkaufmann@emilcott.com.

Feel free to post any questions below in the comments section and we will respond quickly.
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Topics: EPA, Compliance, TSCA & R.E.A.C.H., TSCA, Toxic Substance Control Act, submission, IUR, cdx, chemical manufacturer, Secondary Authorized Official, chemical data report, regulation, Primary Authorized Official, eCDRweb

What You Need to Know: TSCA 2012 CDR Form U Submission

Posted by Shivi Kakar

Oct 11, 2011 11:39:31 PM

Paula Kaufmann, CIH
If you are a foreign or domestic business in the US who is either a chemical importer (resells for use in blending, repackaging) or chemical manufacturer (make new chemicals out of chemicals purchased from others with the exception for pharmaceutical companies), this update is about mandatory compliance with the EPA’s Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), specifically filing the 2012 TSCA Form U “Chemical Data Report”.

Information about the new TSCA CDR Form U reporting tool is rolling in from the EPA.  On September 23 rd the Agency hosted an hour-long webinar in which the 2012 CDR reporting requirements were reviewed and the use of the electronic Form U reporting tool (“e-CDRweb”) was demonstrated. If you missed the webinar or need a rewind, both the presentation materials and recorded webinar have been posted by the EPA at IUR/CDR – About Submissions.

Webinar Take Aways



  • The Agency is emphasizing two new reporting requirements:

    • The standard of “known to or reasonably ascertainable by” for processing and use information (formerly “readily obtainable”)

    • The upfront Confidential Business Information (CBI) substantiation



  • Both the company that contracts for the manufacture AND the toll manufacturer are now considered to be the co-manufacturers of that chemical substance

  • The e-CDRweb tool is designed for joint reporting and has very specific requirements for supplier-EPA communication. Joint reporting is specifically for those instances where a supplier will not disclose the specific chemical name (or TSCA accession number) of a chemical substance or a reactant used to manufacture the TSCA chemical substance because the name is claimed confidential.

  • Registration with the EPA’s Central Data Exchange (CDX) is required prior to accessing e-CDRweb.

    • CDX registration requires the completion of an electronic signature agreement (ESA) form that foreign suppliers must submit by mail.

    • CDX registration for e-CDRweb will be available on November 1, 2011.

    • CDX registration is a multi-part process.



  • The EPA will be providing support for use of the new e-CDRweb tool.

    • A training webinar is tentatively scheduled for November 2011.

    • Comprehensive instructions for the 2012 TSCA Chemical Data Reporting are now online.




To summarize, the e-CDRweb tool looks like it is a much friendlier submittal tool than its predecessor, e-IURweb. The gotcha will be in the preparation of the materials so that the submittal process is easy. Like many other federal filings, understanding what to submit and why may be much more complicated than the actual filing process. The requirements that changed from the 2006 to 2012 range wildly from subtle and minor to extensive and complex.

Did you participate in the EPA’s e-CDRweb webinar? What did you think? Are there any particular “gotchas” that caught your eye?

If you need guidance with what data you should for the EPA TSCA 2012 CDR Submission, please contact Emilcott for help

  • You can also subscribe to our free TSCA e-newsletter which delivers TSCA-related information right to your mailbox.

  • Want more info? Enroll for our free Dec webinar by sending an email to pkaufmann@emilcott.com.


If you have any questions, feel free to post them in the comments section and we will respond quickly.
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Topics: EPA, Compliance, TSCA & R.E.A.C.H., TSCA, Toxic Substance Control Act, submission, IUR, reporting, Form U, cdx, regulation, eCDRweb, central data exchange

343 + 2 = Changes in NYC Asbestos Regulations

Posted by Shivi Kakar

Aug 29, 2011 7:22:05 AM

Dale Wilson, CIH, LEED AP, Sr. Project Manager

"343" is a symbol of great sadness to members of the FDNY and their families as 343 is the number of FDNY firefighters who died on September 11, 2001. That staggering figure is remembered quite readily when recalling the events of that day and during the remembrances that have followed.  However, almost six years later, the lives of two additional NY firefighters were claimed during the demolition of the 9/11-damaged Deutsche Bank Building.

The 41-story Deutsche Bank Building stood adjacent to the World Trade Center and was severely damaged by falling debris and smoke when the Twin Towers collapsed. The damage to the skyscraper was so extensive that it had to be demolished. However, as the federal EPA requires, before it could be demolished, all asbestos-containing materials needed to be removed.

By August 18, 2007, demolition was well underway and the building now stood at only 26 stories tall.  Around 3:40 pm, a massive seven-alarm fire broke out as a result of a discarded cigarette in the asbestos decontamination unit on the 17 th floor.  The building had not been inspected by the Fire Department since March, when it should have been inspected every 15 days.  As a result, a crucial but inoperable fire standpipe forced firefighters to raise hoses up from the street to combat the flames.   Inside the building, three firefighters struggled to pull a hose through the deconstructed building. Only one of these men survived. The configuration of the asbestos abatement added to the difficulty of fighting a fire in an already structurally-compromised building.

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), an institute within the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), completed a description and evaluation of the incident as part of their fire fighter fatality investigation. Several items stand out from the asbestos abatement as contributors to the fire:

  • White plastic sheeting was used to partition the floor area into separate zones.  All these partitions created maze-like conditions for the firefighters.

  • Numerous zones were under negative pressure, as required for asbestos abatement, possibly drawing smoke and fire into localized areas.

  • Stairwell doors were blocked by wooded hatch covers as part of the construction of the asbestos containments.

  • Plastic sheeting, construction debris, and exposed lumber in partitions provided additional fuel.


These contributing conditions created by the asbestos abatement project have been recognized by several authorities, and in an effort to maximize safety, New York City enacted a number of new laws to ensure that asbestos abatement projects are conducted safely.  These laws impact the ways that asbestos projects are filed, approved and inspected, and involve new levels of cooperation among the agencies that oversee asbestos and construction safety:  the NYC Department of Environmental Protection (NYC DEP), the Department of Buildings (DOB) and the Fire Department (FDNY).  Most notably, the NYC DEP created the Asbestos -Technical Review Unit (A-TRU) to ensure that asbestos abatement is conducted safely and a new process for filing for asbestos permits called Asbestos Reporting and Tracking System (ARTS).

ARTS enables applicants to submit applications and/or receive approvals (or objections) electronically.  During the application process, applicants are asked questions to identify if

  • the building’s fire protection systems (e.g., fire alarm or sprinkler system) will be turned off as a result of the abatement work,

  • abatement work will result in blocked or compromised egress or whether any components of the fire protection system are going to be removed as part of the abatement

  • abatement work entails removal of passive fire protection (e.g., fire resistance rated walls, sprayed on fireproofing, or smoke dampers)


If there is an impact to any of these fire protection items then a comprehensive Work Place Safety Plan must be developed for the project indicating abatement containment areas and systems, obstructed and temporary exits, tenant protection and a description of any measures that will be taken to mitigate compromised fire protection systems or means of egress. As a final item intended to promote life safety during abatement projects, the asbestos supervisor must inspect exits daily to ensure that there are no exterior blockages or impediments to exiting. If any blockages or impediments are identified, work must stop until the blockage has been removed.  Essentially, deconstruction and asbestos-abatement work cannot compromise the safety of workers and firefighters.

As Carrie Bettinger noted in a past EHSWire blog, “ In our society and legal system it seems that, yes, someone (or many) has to tragically die before change and regulation are considered.” In this case, the tragedy was 343+2. Hopefully the A-TRU process and increased oversight from NYC DEP, DOB, and FDNY will prevent another similar tragedy from occurring.

Postscript:  The last of the Deutsche Bank tower criminal trials were completed in July, 2011. More information can be found at http://www.nytimes.com/2011/07/07/nyregion/final-defendant-is-acquitted-in-deutsche-bank-fire-trial.html.
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Topics: indoor air quality, health and safety, Construction H&S, EPA, Emergency Response, Homeland Security, H&S Training, worker safety, regulation, construction, emergency response training, demolition, 9/11, Work Place Safety Plan, asbestos, September 11, Deutsche Bank NYC, A-TRU, 9-11, Fire Safety

Hazard Communication: Do You Know What You Have the Right-to-Know?

Posted by Shivi Kakar

Jul 3, 2011 11:51:26 PM

By John Defillippo, CHMP

Do you have hazardous chemicals in your workplace? If you think the answer is no, are you sure?


OSHA defines a hazardous chemical as one that presents either a physical or a health hazard. Many common and readily available products such as paints, cleaners, and other materials found in the workplace meet this definition. In fact, last year OSHA issued over 6,300 violations to companies that failed to comply with this standard. As we noted in a previous blog, non-compliance with the Hazard Communication standard was the third-largest source of OSHA violations in 2009 and 2010!

If you are an employer, you have a legal obligation to provide a workplace that is free of recognized hazards and to communicate any hazards present to those in the workplace.  In 1985, OSHA established the Hazard Communication Standard ( 1910.1200) to ensure, in part, that all workers have the "right-to-know" about the hazardous chemicals in their workplace.

Essentially, employees have a Right-to-Know about any hazardous substances that they may come into contact with at work and how to protect themselves from adverse affects. Employees, for their part, have a responsibility to follow directions and work safely by using products for their intended purpose and in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions to reduce risk and chance of exposure. This is where the Hazard Communication Standard “kicks in”, as all workplace information about hazardous substances needs to be in a Written Hazard Communication Program.  This "HazCom" program must contain

  • A list of all hazardous chemicals in the workplace and a Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) for each chemical (or product) on that list

  • All employees must have access to that list and the MSDS’s during their work shift

  • Methods to communicate hazards of these chemicals to employees, on-site contractors and visitors such as signs and labels

  • Records showing that all employees have been properly trained to understand the hazards, read the MSDSs and understand labeling and signs.


In addition to the federal OSHA requirements for labeling, the State of New Jersey has specific labeling requirements for all vessels, piping and containers that contain hazardous chemicals.

So, do you have hazardous chemicals in your workplace? Are you rethinking your answer?


If you have products that arrive with an MSDS, and you have not implemented a written HazCom Program, you’ll need to get a program in place to be OSHA compliant. If you have been following the standard, consider the following:

  • Are you keeping up with its requirements?

  • When was the last time your HazCom Program was reviewed?

  • Is your hazardous chemical list and MSDS collection up-to-date?

  • Do you know what OSHA considers “Hazardous”?

  • Is every hazardous chemical container labeled properly – even the transfer containers?

  • Are ALL your employees trained about the workings of your HazCom program and the hazards of each chemical in their workplace?


Now do you know the answer? Or, do you have more questions?


If you are confused or intimidated, don’t worry.  A great resource is the Institute of Hazardous Materials Managers which certifies individuals as Hazardous Materials Managers (CHMM) and Hazardous Materials Practitioners (CHMP). These trained professionals must demonstrate various levels of knowledge, expertise, and excellence in the management of hazardous materials. And, there are EHS (Environmental, Health and Safety) experts like Emilcott everywhere – their job is to help companies stay in compliance with state and federal regulations while protecting employees. No matter what resource you find, just ask if they are experienced in developing Hazardous Communication programs. Not only will workers stay health and safety, you’ll see added benefits like prevention of property damage, reduced insurance claims and costs, and, of course, your company will not be cited for OSHA’s third most-common violation!

Have you found any chemicals in your workplace that you didn’t know are hazardous? Does your “right-to-know” increase your job comfort level or concern you? And, have you carefully reviewed the company HazCom plan so that you understand “what to do if…”?
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Topics: OSHA, health and safety, General Industry H&S, OSHA Compliance, General EHS, H&S Training, Hazardous Waste Management, HazCom, Compliance, regulation, General Industry, emergency response training, Exposure, hazardous chemicals, chemicals, MSDS, Hazard Communication Standard

May 2011 was Busy for OSHA

Posted by Shivi Kakar

May 31, 2011 6:18:05 AM



Paula Kaufmann, CIH

As an occupational and safety professional, I’ve noticed that the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has been busy over the last few weeks!  The following is a summary of highlights of interest to Emilcott clients.  Did any of these catch your attention?

Highlight #1: Up-to-Date OSHA Standards


Announcement of a final rule to help keep OSHA standards up-to-date and better enable employers to comply with their regulatory obligation. The concept should allow OSHA to easily remove outdated requirements, streamline and simplify standards without reducing employee protection. The rule is to be published soon in the Federal Register:  OSHA Standards Improvement Project-Phase III final rule.

Benefit to employers:  OSHA estimates that the final rule will result in annual cost savings to employers exceeding $43 million. Now that’s an improvement to cheer about!

In the news release, OSHA stated that there will not be any NEW requirements set by this rule, so employers will be able to comply with it immediately. (However, it seems that there will be modifications...Emilcott will be keeping a lookout for those and post an update below or as a new EHSWire post.)  Here are some examples listed in the news release on this rule:

  • Respiratory Protection

    • Aligning air cylinder testing requirements for self-contained breathing apparatuses with U.S. Department of Transportation regulations

    • Clarifying that the provisions of Appendix D, which contains information for employees using respirators when not required under the standard, are mandatory if the employee chooses to use a respirator.



  • Sanitation

    • Defining “potable water” to meet the current Environmental Protection Agency



  • Access to Exposure and Medical Records

    • Deleting a number of requirements for employers to transmit exposure and medical records to NIOSH



  • Slings

    • Requiring that employers use only slings marked with manufacturers' loading information




Highlight #2: OSHA Injury and Illness Logs - Musculoskeletal Disorders (“MSD”)


Reopening the public record on proposed record-keeping rule to add work-related musculoskeletal disorders column.  This keeps popping up!

  • In January of  2010, OSHA proposed to revise its Occupational Injury and Illness Recording and Reporting Requirements regulation to restore a column to the OSHA 300 log that employers would have to check if an incident they already have recorded under existing rules is an MSD.  

  • On January 25, 2011, OSHA withdrew this proposed revision.

  • On May 17, 2011, OSHA reopens the public record on a proposed rule.


Highlight #3: A Survey of Private Sector Employees


Launch of a targeted employer survey to collect information that would improve the development of future rules, compliance assistance and outreach efforts.

  • The survey will be sent to private sector employers of all sizes and across all industries under OSHA's jurisdiction. Questions include whether respondents already have a safety management system, whether they perform annual inspections, who manages safety at their establishments and what kinds of hazards they encounter at their facilities. Participation in the survey is voluntary.


Highlight #4: Fall Protection for Residential Construction Workers


Online presentation about fall protection specifically designed for residential construction workers. (This is really great as residential construction crews frequently overlook safety – just look at all the roofers walking around the top of your neighborhood homes!)

On a personal note, my son is currently volunteering as a roofer on a Habitat for Humanity home construction site … he informs me that he is wearing fall protection and the roof has anchor points! 

So, can you tell that Emilcott is pretty excited about these changes? Instead of putting the onus on employers to become more aware of OSHA, OSHA is streamlining existing rules to match other government agencies (radical!), listening to employers before leaping into new regulations, and looking at alternative messaging techniques to market segments that frequently fall in the cracks.

If you’re interested in what’s happening at OSHA, just take a look at the loooooong list of May press releases…Are there any highlights that you think important to you or American businesses? Any predictions for June?
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Topics: OSHA, General Industry H&S, OSHA Compliance, General EHS, Construction H&S, Compliance, worker safety, reporting, regulation, construction, fall protection, federal register, log, standards, musculoskeletal disorder

DELAYED!! TSCA Form U Submission 2011 Period

Posted by Shivi Kakar

May 15, 2011 11:56:18 PM

Paula Kaufmann, CIH

We have some news on this year’s TSCA IUR Form U submission.  Well, it really isn’t information about the requirements – but we do know that this year’s Form U submission period will not be June 1 to September 30.  It will most likely be later this year.  So, we all can move that task to another segment of the calendar year!

More Information


On May 11, 2011, the EPA issued a Federal Register Notice amending the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Inventory Update Reporting (IUR) regulations by delaying  the June 1 to September 30 submission period for the 2011 Form U reports.  The notice indicated that this delay will not alter the timing of subsequent submission periods (e.g., the submission period from June 1, 2016 to September 30, 2016).  This is an interesting statement as one of the changes included in the proposed IUR Rule is a change of the reporting period cycle to every four (4) years from the current five (5) year cycle.

The EPA is delaying the submission period because the proposed IUR modifications rule has not yet been finalized.  EPA expects to have the final version of the changes to the IUR reporting requirements in the near future. The revised 2011 submission period will be announced with the publication of the final IUR modification rule. 

How does this delay what the EPA rule refers to as a “suspension” affect what needs to be done for the 2010 reporting period?  It seems that the EPA will mandate a new submission period but it is not clear when this will be during 2011.

  • We are assuming that the reporting period will remain as the 2010 calendar year. 

  • Our next assumption, or guess, is that the Form U submission period will shift to September 1 to December 31, but that will require that the final rule on the IUR modifications be published very soon.


“Food” for Thought…


As recently as March 4, 2011, representatives from the American Petroleum Institute (API) met with the EPA presenting concerns about several aspects of the proposed IUR modifications rule.  One topic the API presented was that when the last set of revisions of the IUR was finalized in 2003 with the next reporting period was extended by one year shifting from 2004 to 2005 with Form U submission in 2006.  During 2004 and 2005, the EPA held many workshops and issued clarification and guidance documents.

And, for now, we wait for the Final Rule and hope that the data we have all collected for the 2010 reporting period will be adequate.  Emilcott's recommendations for what to do while we wait are in my January blog:  “ TSCA IUR Update – What Are the Changes ?”. Essentially, we are advising our clients to proceed with the collection of 2010 inventory data with a threshold of 25,000 lbs.  Here are a couple of items to keep on your radar:

  • Be sure your list of manufactured chemicals is complete.  Your list should be based on all chemical processes and imported materials received at the site and not just on the products.

  • When calculating individual substance volumes – include imported mixtures with those manufactured at the site aggregating all mixtures containing that substance. 


...And, Emilcott will continue to keep you posted!

What to do if you need help or have questions?


If you need assistance related to the TSCA New Chemicals regulatory requirements or the potential changes due to the Inventory Update Reporting Rule, Emilcott can guide you through the reporting.  We can also help you navigate the maze of reporting a potential Form U violation from prior filing years to the EPA (See http://www.emilcott.com/services/svcenvcompliance.asp). 

As more information becomes available from the EPA regarding the IUR and as testing of the electronic tool begins, Emilcott will keep you up-to-date via EHSWire and our "Regulatory Updates" Newsletter.  

Please give me a call at 1-800-886-3645 or write a comment below if you have any questions or additional information to contribute.
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Topics: Emilcott, health and safety, General EHS, EPA, Compliance, TSCA & R.E.A.C.H., TSCA, Toxic Substance Control Act, reporting, regulation, chemicals

TSCA IUR Early Spring 2011 Update

Posted by Shivi Kakar

Apr 27, 2011 11:11:17 AM

by Paula Kaufmann

In the August 13, 2010 TSCA Inventory Update Reporting Modifications - Proposed Rule, the EPA anticipated the promulgation of the final rule by the Spring of 2011.  Spring arrived 3 weeks ago, and the final IUR Reporting Modification rule has not been published.  As such, the reporting modifications and specific reporting period have not been finalized.  In addition, the Agency has not released a test version of the revised Form U electronic reporting software.  It is possible that the Agency will change the proposed 2011 submission period (June 1 – September 30) to another 4–month period later in 2011.

EPA's intended final rule was sent to the White House Office of Management and Budget (OMB) on January 20, 2011.  Since the beginning of February, OMB has held meetings with the American Chemistry Council, the Society of Chemical Manufacturers and Affiliates Inc. (SOCMA), the Small Business Administration, the National Mining Association, and associations that represent companies that must comply with the regulations.

So -- once again, the question is “now what to do?”


As mentioned in my January blog “ TSCA IUR Update – What Are the Changes ?” we are advising Emilcott clients to proceed with the collection of 2010 inventory data with a threshold of 25,000 lbs.  Here are a couple of items to keep on your radar:

  • Be sure your list of manufactured chemicals is complete.  Your list should be based on all chemical processes and imported materials received at the site and not just on the products.

  • When calculating individual substance volumes – include imported mixtures with those manufactured at the site aggregating all mixtures containing that substance. 


Additional data that may be needed for the 2011 reporting are listed below.  Depending upon how you gather your information, you may want to request this along with the import or manufacturing volume information.

  • Production volumes at or above 25,000 lbs directly exported and not domestically processed or used.

  • All quantities of substances subject to rules and orders in the following sections:

    • Section 5(a)(2) Significant New Use Rules (SNURs)

    • Section 5(b)(4) Chemicals of concern to EPA

    • Section 6 Prohibitions for chemicals with unreasonable risks

    • Section 5(e) Requirements or restrictions on chemical production or use

    • Section 5(f) Chemical with an unreasonable risk




What to do if you need help?


If you need assistance related to the TSCA New Chemicals regulatory requirements or the potential changes due to the Inventory Update Reporting Rule, Emilcott can guide you through the reporting. We can also help you navigate the maze of reporting a potential Form U violation from prior filing years to the EPA (See http://www.emilcott.com/services/svcenvcompliance.asp).  As more information becomes available from the EPA regarding the IUR and as testing of the electronic tool begins, Emilcott will keep you up-to-date via EHSWire and our “Regulatory Updates” Newsletter. If you have any TSCA IUR questions or concerns, feel free to contact Emilcott or post your question below!
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Topics: EPA, Compliance, TSCA & R.E.A.C.H., TSCA, Toxic Substance Control Act, reporting, regulation, chemicals

The Triangle Shirtwaist Fire (1911) - A Turning Point for Workplace Safety

Posted by Shivi Kakar

Mar 23, 2011 3:39:09 PM

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Topics: OSHA, health and safety, General Industry H&S, OSHA Compliance, General EHS, Construction H&S, Emergency Response, H&S Training, worker safety, Occupational Health, Occupational Safety, regulation, Fire Safety, shirtwaist, fire, triangle

Hazardous Waste How-To for Manufacturers, Laboratories and other General Industry Companies

Posted by Shivi Kakar

Mar 14, 2011 7:27:43 AM



Carrie Bettinger, CHMM, CSP

As a Certified Hazardous Materials Manager (CHMM) and a Certified Safety Professional (CSP) I often make recommendations to our “General Industry” clients in an effort to lift their game with dealing with hazardous waste.  There are multiple layers of compliance issues related to hazardous waste handling, and, as with most regulations, a little education (TRAINING!!) goes a long way in understanding the game plan!  The intention of this blog is to provide a brief discussion of the key regulations and their associated training requirements.

The Rules


The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has very strict guidelines regarding the generation, transportation, treatment, storage  and disposal of Hazardous Waste, which “ General Industry” businesses (schools, colleges; hospitals; trucking/freight companies; manufacturer; laboratories; …well, just about everyone) needs to know!
OSHA uses the term "general industry" to refer to all industries not included in agriculture, construction or maritime. General industries are regulated by OSHA's general industry standards, directives, and standard interpretations.

Give me an R! Give me a C ! Give me an R! Give me an A! What’s that spell?!  HAZARDOUS WASTE!

The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) appeared on the environmental scene in 1976 after Congress decided that people shouldn’t be building homes on top of highly hazardous waste dumps or Farmer Joe shouldn’t have a side business of burying industrial waste on the family farm.   RCRA is a complex law with lots of parts and many industries are affected by its components.  In addition to being complex, the text of the Act with all of its parts and sections is hard to follow.  My primary technical focus tends to be on the Generators of Hazardous Waste (40 CFR Part 262) . RCRA Training requirements for generators can be found in 40 CFR 262.34(a)(4) which conveniently (NOT) refers you to look at 40 CFR 265.16 on Personnel Training.

But the EPA’s RCRA law is not the only player when it comes to the game of shipping hazardous waste off your site.  The other major player is the Department of Transportation (DOT), and its Hazardous Materials shipping training requirements are found in 49 CFR Part 172, Subpart H.   The International Air  Transport Association (IATA) has rules for the air transport of hazardous materials ( http://www.iata.org/) including training requirements.

To simplify, RCRA is all about Hazardous WASTE and the DOT and IATA rules kick in when you’re dealing with hazardous MATERIALS, and guess what hazardous waste is?  That’s right it’s hazardous materials in DOT and IATA eyes.  For those who generate or ship Hazardous Waste, compliance for with EPA RCRA and DOT /IATA rules starts with required and effective training.

The Required Training


So, if you generate hazardous waste and you need to get it off your site, here is a brief summary of the training employees who either generate or handle hazardous waste should have -- per both EPA and DOT/IATA.

All employees at sites that generate hazardous waste need to be trained in how to:

  • Properly identify what qualifies as regulated “Hazardous Waste” per federal (EPA) or your state requirements.

  • Know where to properly dispose of any hazardous waste you may generate (I will give you a hint:   It’s NOT down the sink drain!).

  • Know how to handle and dispose of highly hazardous waste (very toxic, reactive or explosive) to prevent injuries, and who to contact for questions or emergencies.


Employees who are designated as responsible for the management and control of this hazardous waste need additional training. And, depending on the size of the facility, it is prudent to provide this training to a backup employee or two. This additional training includes how to

  • Properly label containers

  • Implement accumulation area requirements and time-on-site limits

  • Inspect hazardous waste accumulation areas for leaking or damaged containers or other problems

  • Complete Hazardous Waste shipping manifests

  • Ensure proper shipping methods and a qualified transporter are used

  • Develop site-specific procedures

  • Know and implement emergency procedures and site contingency plans


Refresher Training


A common point of confusion is when refresher training is needed for employees.  The DOT and EPA have two separate requirements:

  • The EPA requires annual refresher training for their regulations.

  • The DOT requires refresher training every 3 years for their regulations.


And, companies must ensure training for new employees or those newly assigned to the role within 6 months of their new post to be in compliance with both RCRA and DOT regulations .

The Bottom Line

We can all help to ensure clean air, clean soil and clean water in our neighborhoods by understanding and following federal and state hazardous waste/hazardous materials regulations. When accidents happen (and they do), labeling, manifests, emergency plans – everything that DOT/IATA and RCRA training develops for your company – are vital in the cleanup of the environment and protection of employee and public health and safety.

For more information or questions regarding how to handle hazardous waste or where to obtain training, please comment below or contact Emilcott.  As part of  The Emilcott Training Institute, we offer private hazardous communication, hazardous materials and hazardous waste training specific to company or site needs. We also offer public classes for both DOT/IATA and RCRA:
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Topics: Emilcott, OSHA, DOT, General EHS, EPA, Emergency Response, H&S Training, Hazardous Waste Management, Hazardous Materials, Compliance, Lab Safety & Electrical, regulation, General Industry, emergency response training, Occupational Training, IATA, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Lab Safety, hazwaste, transportation, hazmat, generation, RCRA

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