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Environmental Health and Safety Blog | EHSWire

NEWS: NYC is Cracking Down on Workers with Fraudulent Safety Training Cards

Posted by Emilcott Associates

Nov 16, 2015 3:37:04 PM

Due to the increasing number of deaths taking place on construction sites, city investigators are showing up undercover at jobsites and arresting workers that are using fake safety training cards, according to the Daily News.

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Topics: OSHA, workplace safety, OSHA Compliance, worker safety, Occupational Safety, safety, safety training, heavy equipment safety

Hot off the Presses: HazCom 2012

Posted by Shivi Kakar

Mar 20, 2012 9:19:17 AM

OSHA has published the final rule updating the Hazard Communications Standard as of today 3/20/12.  It will be published in the CFR officially on 3/26/12, but is available online now through the OSHA website. View Rule Here

Secretary of Labor Solis and Assistant Secretary Dr. Michaels provided a press release conference call this morning where they indicated that the new standard will reduce injuries to employees, reduce costs for employers and allow US manufacturers to be more competitive in a global market.

There were a few questions regarding combustible dust and unclassified hazards, which are now labeled as Hazards NOC (not otherwise classified).  Combustible dust will be classified as such and will not be placed in the Hazards NOC category.  A number of compliance dates were specified including employee training to be completed by December 1, 2013 and full compliance by June 2016.

OSHA launched its new website on HazCom 2012 today.  It provides guidance on compliance and frequently asked questions regarding the new standard.

Now that the final rule is released, look for an Emilcott Free Webinar, HazCom 2012 made Simple
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Topics: Emilcott, OSHA, health and safety, OSHA Compliance, HazCom, Occupational Health, Occupational Safety

2011: A Year In Recap

Posted by Shivi Kakar

Jan 4, 2012 3:29:54 AM

Bringing in the New Year is always an exciting time for everyone. People enjoy setting new goals, looking forward to the journey that the New Year brings and starting that resolution they promise they are going to keep. While the New Year brings many things to look forward to, it also is a time where we look back at the year that has passed and take a moment to reflect on what has happened.

At Emilcott, 2011 was a successful year where we were able to tackle new projects, serve our clients and continue to respond to current industry issues in the environmental, health and safety field. Though we have had many great memories from 2011, we would like to mention some of the things that stood out most in our business for 2011.

Hurricane Irene – the immense and powerful Atlantic hurricane that left a path of destruction and devastation was something that definitely stands out in 2011. We remember this event not only because of the wreckage caused by the storm, but also because of the after effects. The staff at Emilcott recognized the importance of addressing the legacy of water intrusion and the promise of mold after the storm and stressed to clients the importance of “timing” to address how to respond to this problem, as well as the importance of selecting the proper remediation technique along with an EHS mold expert and Emilcott’s mold remediation strategy. (Read more: Hurricane Irene Leaves a Legacy of Water Intrusion and the Promise of Mold)

Energy Sector – Emilcott has been thrilled to be able to participate in many different initiatives within the energy sector.  Regionally important to the growth of our economy, the ongoing infrastructure improvements have given us substantial health and safety support work. In EHSWire during 2011 we addressed many occupational hazards as Occupational Heat-related Illnesses where we went over the symptoms that workers may experience, as well as what should be done if someone does experience these symptoms. Besides dealing with working conditions such as heat, Emilcott also provided information on the truths about occupational slips, trips and falls which ended up costing American businesses $13.67 billion in workers compensation costs in 2008. Adhering to proper safety protocols and preventing injuries is something that benefits businesses and their workers. OSHA provides a Walking/Working Surfaces – Safety and Health Topic page which provides links to all the applicable standards.

With issues such as heat affecting the health of workers to preventing injuries on job sites, Emilcott has seen our fair share of mishaps. Being able to share our experiences and knowledge with others never gets old. From teaching someone the hazards about working near a crane, or things you should do when working in certain environments, Emilcott has always tried keeping people in the loop. We even have a 10-Hour Construction Industry Outreach Training Course based on the requirements established by OSHA which is a very hands-on and interactive class that we recommend to avoid a future work related issue. (Read more: Work Near a CRANE? Learn the Hazards!)

9/11 Tenth Anniversary – focused the changes that have occurred since 9/11/2001 such as the new precautions that have taken place on the American Chemical Security issue.   The DHS (the Department of Homeland Security) has been increasing their focus on utilities and chemical facilities which may become targets for terrorist activities and the DHS Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standard (CFATS) now requires completing and submitting a Top Screen analysis to the DHS.

The James Zadroga Act , which was authorized to broaden, renew funding and extend benefits to Ground Zero workers whose death was a result of exposure, is of great significance and has put new emphasis on the importance of proper real-time environmental site monitoring. New technologies are available to protect site workers and the public from exposure to hazardous substances such as those from the collapse of the WTC towers. (Read more: 9/11 Tenth Anniversary Focuses on American Chemical Security)

Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA) – was of major importance not only to Emilcott, but also to facilities who are manufacturers or importers of chemicals in amounts of 25,000 pounds or greater. With so many questions regarding TSCA and the changes, Emilcott decided to put on a free webinar along with posting a number of blogs that answered many of the concerns our clients had. Emilcott was able to use its expertise and help many clients with TSCA compliance questions and concerns regarding the developments of IUR reporting and reporting obligations in 2011 for the calendar year 2010. (Read more: August 2011 Update on the TSCA IUR-now-CDR Rule)

Though Emilcott has had many remarkable memories of 2011, we felt these 4 really left an impression on our business. Emilcott is privileged to know that we were able to assist our clients in many different businesses not only in 2011, but throughout our history. Emilcott looks forward to a productive 2012 and we are excited to see what this year has in store for us.

Do you have any environmental, health or safety concerns for 2012? If so, please share them with us below!
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Topics: Emilcott, OSHA, health and safety, CFATS, Hazardous Materials, worker safety, Occupational Health, Occupational Safety, TSCA, Toxic Substance Control Act, Uncategorized, Mold

Expensive, damaging and possibly fatal…the truth about occupational slips, trips and falls!

Posted by Shivi Kakar

Jun 13, 2011 3:00:40 AM

By Eileen Lucier

Slips, trips, and falls aren’t at the top of anyone’s “most glamorous” EHS topics list.  Many people perceive slips, trips, and falls as minor incidents resulting solely from either carelessness or clumsiness. In fact, losing your footing is the basis for basic comedic art (ever watch “The Three Stooges” or “America’s Funniest Home Videos”?)  

Quite the opposite -- slips, trips, and falls are a very costly and serious worker safety issue. In 2008, these incidents cost American businesses a staggering $13.67 billion in direct workers compensation costs. That’s more than any other cause and more than the combined cost of the third through sixth ranked causes. 

Injury, Illness and Death Facts You Should Know


Slips, Trips, and Falls….

How can slips, trips, and falls be prevented?


As with most safety hazards, slip, trip, and fall hazards can be minimized with a combination of good work practices, proper use of appropriate equipment, proper facility and equipment maintenance, and worker training. OSHA’s Walking/Working Surfaces - Safety and Health Topic page provides links to all the applicable standards. Some basic preventive practices include:

  • Good housekeeping

    • Keep floors clean, dry, and sanitary

    • Clean up spills promptly

    • Keep aisles and walkways free of obstructions and clutter



  • Footwear

    • Fit properly

    • Require slip-resistant foot in areas prone to wet or slippery conditions



  • Fall prevention and protection

    • Provide appropriate fall arrest systems



  • Facilities and equipment

    • Walking and working surfaces

      • Floor surfaces should not be slippery or uneven

      • Install non-slip flooring in areas prone to wet or slippery conditions

      • Maintain floors in good condition

      • Equip elevated working surfaces and stairways with guardrails

      • Protect floor holes such as drains with grates or covers

      • Promptly remove ice and snow from walkways, parking lots, etc.

      • Adequate lighting

      • Ladders

        • Provide properly rated ladders

        • Maintain ladders in good condition







  • Training

    • Provide worker training for

      • Slip, trip, and fall hazards

      • Ladder use

      • Personal fall arrest systems






Don’t Slip Up on Safety!


Bruising, twisting or breaking a bone makes your work life and personal life extra challenging – it’s worth it to take a few minutes to prevent the accident from ever happening. On TV and in the movies, slips and other footing mishaps are carefully orchestrated with hidden padding, stunt doubles, some great camera tricks, and, of course, an endless supply of retakes. When you’re working on the job, there’s only one chance! 

Using the tips listed above, take a look around your workplace to see if it meets the criteria to prevent slips, trips and falls.  Don’t forget to look at your own feet to see that you are properly dressed for the environment and job duties. If you see a situation that is unsafe or could potentially be a slip, trip and fall hot spot, make sure you point it out to your coworkers and safety officer so that a permanent solution can be found.

Has it happened to you?


Have you experienced a slip, trip or fall on the job?  Could it have been prevented? What was the outcome for you and your company?
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Topics: health and safety, General Industry H&S, OSHA Compliance, General EHS, Construction H&S, Emergency Response, H&S Training, Compliance, worker safety, Occupational Safety, Lab Safety & Electrical, construction, General Industry, Fire Safety, fall protection, trips, slips

Poison Ivy: Outdoor Worker Public Enemy

Posted by Shivi Kakar

Jun 6, 2011 2:31:08 AM

Daniel Senatus

According to the CDC, poison ivy is a common poisonous plant found throughout the United States. It can be found in forests, swamplands, roadsides, backyards and even in urban environments. That means, wherever you are, poison ivy could be right there!  And, it’s not always easy to spot.  When trying to identify this plant, consider the species, the season and your geographical location as the physical characteristics can vary. Being able to recognize local varieties, especially at a work site, is your key to avoiding exposure.

Poison ivy produces a liquid called urushiol, this is the so called “active ingredient” that causes the itching, blisters and rashes in most people who touch it. Outdoor workers can be exposed to poison ivy in multiple ways:

  • Physical contact with the plant (including the roots!)

  • Touching tools, equipment or livestock that have been in contact with the plant

  • Inhaled aerosolized particles from burning the plant.


Recognition

Your ability to recognize poison ivy is the first step in preventing exposure. Depending upon where you live and the season, the plant can vary widely. It always has three leaves (like many other plants) but the size, shape and coloring may fool you. The following links provide some pictures and other useful information to help you identify the poison ivy lurking in your work place:

Prevention

When working in areas infested with this wicked plant, personal protective equipment (PPE) like gloves and boots, long sleeve shirts and long pants tucked into boots will help. Be extra careful to not touch the exposed clothing when removing it and wash it in the hottest water possible using copious amounts of soap and water with lots of room to agitate. If you’re not sure – wash it again as you can get a rash from clothing or tools that have the urushiol resin from even years back!

Always wash your skin with plenty of soap and cold water after exposure. (Hot water opens your pores and lets the resin absorb into your skin.) If you can get scrubbing within ten minutes of contact, you may have dodged the poison ivy bullet! And, always clean all tools and equipment that come in contact with the plant with soap, water and a bleach solution to avoid re-exposure.

Follow comprehensive decontamination methods – treat the urushiol resin as a chemical contaminant!

First Aid

How do you know you have poison ivy? Advice from the Mayo Clinic includes

Signs and symptoms of a poison ivy rash include:

Often, the rash looks like a straight line because of the way the plant brushes against the skin. But if you come into contact with a piece of clothing or pet fur that has urushiol on it, the rash may be more spread out.  The reaction usually develops 12 to 48 hours after exposure and can last up to eight weeks. The severity of the rash is dependent on the amount of urushiol that gets on your skin.

Once you know you’re exposed, wash exposed skin with plenty of soap and cold water to break down and encapsulate the oil. Web MD advises these additional steps:

An alternative is rubbing alcohol, which can dissolve and remove the oils from your skin. If you can remove the oil within 10 minutes, you are unlikely to develop the rash. Symptoms from a mild rash can sometimes be relieved by the following:

And, of course, if the reaction seems to be severe, is spreading or lasting longer than a few weeks, ask for immediate professional medical attention.

Three leaves? Be cautious!

At Emilcott, we frequently run into job sites with high potential for poison ivy exposure…think about the uncleared, overgrown or unkempt places that surveyers, highway workers, laborers, HazWOPER workers, engineers, inspectors,  construction workers, and landscapers, often find themselves! And don’t think that you’re immune either. My coworker, Paula Kaufmann, CIH, wrote about her overconfidence that she had not been sensitized to urushiol (and thought she was “immune” and her inevitable reaction to repeated exposure. Maybe she should have paid attention to Emilcott’s poison ivy awareness and other outdoor hazards that is a part of many of our health and safety training courses!

Have you had an experience with poison ivy on the job? Were you prepared ahead of time? If not, what happened?
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Topics: Personal Protective Equipment, General Industry H&S, General EHS, Construction H&S, worker safety, Occupational Safety, Exposure, poison ivy, Occupational Training

Setting up Health and Safety Communications in Remote, Mountainous Work Areas

Posted by Shivi Kakar

Apr 11, 2011 8:46:26 AM

By Don Hoeschele, MS, CHMM

In an age where we are reliant on modern technology as a part of our job, it is difficult to imagine not being able to use your cell phone or access the Internet because of topography.  As the Field Safety Manager for a 300-mile electric power transmission power line construction project, one of my first tasks was to address the question “How do you make communication possible across 275 miles of relatively unpopulated, harsh mountainous territory”?  Specifically, I had to meet OSHA’s requirements for communication:  29 CFR 1926.35 “Employee Emergency Action Plans” and 29 CFR 1926.50 “Medical Services and First Aid”.  

For a project health and safety administrator, it is vital to be able to communicate with your team members and with outside resources. How do you keep tabs on who is where and what is happening? How do you find if something has gone wrong or someone needs help?  In fact, these are the reasons that OSHA implemented the Standards listed above – life and death situations may depend upon it!

On this particular project, numerous construction crews were working at different, extremely remote locations with a distance of several miles between each work crew. While the power line tower construction and electric line-stringing companies included requirements for an eventual end-to-end 2-way radio system, the system was not available for at least the first year of the project. And, since cell phones and the average two-way radio systems were not able to be consistently or reliably available to meet the communication needs required for this project, I needed to find an alternative. 

After digging around and countless meetings, calls, and trips to all kinds of communications companies, we settled on a resourceful, cost-conscious and effective method of communicating between the crews, safety personnel, surveyors and managers. The end result was a creative mix of new technologies:

  • Cell phone signal boosters in each vehicle in the field

  • GPS SPOT locator units for each  crew

  • New technology satellite phones for work crews heading into the most remote locations.  


The vendor that built these systems also owned many of the frequencies needed for an end-to-end two-way radio system that would reach across the 275-mile project location.

Of course, the system’s effectiveness had to be proven – we were relying on it! So, I spent hours deep in the mountains field testing the equipment in some of the most remote project locations I have ever seen. Luckily, I was helped by some of the project team members who had spent a great deal of time in this area. Experience also helps communication!

This project had unusual difficulties – a big, remote, mountainous and unpopulated area – that could have thwarted OSHA’s communication requirements.  At any time, it would have been easy to throw in the towel, cross our fingers or perhaps put together a patched-together system and hope it worked.  However, with some tenacious ingenuity and a confidence that a reliable health and safety communication system could be found, we were able to overcome the almost overwhelming challenges and put an effective field communication system into place.

Have you been faced with challenges to provide adequate communication systems for your employees?  What has made a job site seem almost impossible to conquer? What did you do to overcome those challenges?
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Topics: OSHA, health and safety, General Industry H&S, OSHA Compliance, General EHS, Construction H&S, Emergency Response, HazCom, Compliance, worker safety, Occupational Health, Occupational Safety, Hazard Communication Standard, communication

Air Monitoring at Construction Sites…My New Reality

Posted by Shivi Kakar

Apr 4, 2011 3:33:53 PM

by Ed Pearl

I have been doing on-site environmental health and safety (EHS) work at many types of outdoor job sites for six years.  A big part of the site safety manager at a construction project is air monitoring. When workers have the possibility of exposure to an airborne hazard, it's critical to take frequent measurements of site conditions (often airborne particulates or hydrocarbons) to define worker risk for exposure. When the risk increases, the safety plan kicks in to prevent overexposure. Knowing what is floating in the air at the job site (and how much of it) is why air monitoring is such an important part of any construction site safety program.

For the last several months I have been working at a former Manufactured Gas Plant (MGP) responsible for, yet again, another air monitoring program.  The difference is, for the first time, I’m using the Greenlight Environmental Monitoring System for air monitoring – a completely new experience.   

How I Used to do Air Monitoring


Maybe this daily process looks familiar to you? Snow, rain, ice, cold…the daily routine didn’t vary much!

  • I collected the air monitoring instruments at the end of the day and downloaded each one individually to get the day’s readings.



  • I checked through the day’s data to see if there were any problems (maybe a little late?).


A real leap in monitoring technology meant that I was using a laptop for data collection!  I drove or walked to each field station to download data onto the computer. Sunny days, while pleasant, had their own challenges – have you ever tried to look at a laptop screen while combating the glare of full sun? Needless to say, when it came to technology I was open…but skeptical.

My New Perspective


The differences between the fairly standard monitoring equipment setup (even with the laptop addition) and how the Greenlight System works is like night and day. As I worked, my initial impressions were shaped by Greenlight’s ease of setup and operation as the entire system design has been set up from an EHS professional’s perspective:

  • All monitoring devices in the field are turned on and off from a central location.

  • No tedious end-of-the-day drive and download because the System continuously feeds and records monitoring data to a server in “real time”.  


From the minute the project starts up each day, the monitoring results are displayed in REAL TIME on my operator screen.  I can see ALL of the readings from the entire site’s monitoring stations at the same time, no matter where they are in the field!  In fact, now I see site conditions as they happen so that I can take action as needed. And, if a field station or monitoring device is non-responsive, I am notified almost immediately rather than discovering that there’s no valid data to download at the end of the day.

The Greenlight System that I’m using includes what I consider to be ever-important – a weather station:  temperature, humidity, wind speed, and wind direction. Having this information corresponding to particulate or hydrocarbon monitoring -- in real time -- is critical when trying to define potential exposures to hazardous materials and implement appropriate controls. Since weather conditions directly affect air monitoring and have a potential to change quickly (and sometimes without much warning), the data pouring in from the weather station is very useful to have at my fingertips.

The Learning Curve Levels Out


Since I am a new operator of the Greenlight System, it has been a learning process for me. Starting out was a little bit scary! After six years of doing it pretty much one way, it’s a new way of both thinking and reacting. But, the ease of operation and the effectiveness of the System have transformed me…allowing me to provide more effective support to the site construction team. 

  • Need the entire site air monitoring and weather condition information? With the data on my computer screen and on the server, if anyone needs a snapshot of site conditions at any moment, I can supply that information.

  • Want to know what happened last week? I’ve got it the information all ready to go! It no longer takes hours or days to find the right data and put it into a format that is understandable and explainable.

  • Concerned that there is a change in airborne contaminant levels at the site?  I’m on top of that, too! Even when a small change occurs, I am notified immediately, and I can quickly investigate. 


The Data Speaks


My sense is that when the construction team experiences how available the air monitoring data is and that with these data we can be very responsive with control implementation, they are more confident that are working in a safe environment.  The workers seem more content, and project managers are pretty happy knowing that they can continue working safely while staying on time and on budget.

What new innovations do you see in particulate and hydrocarbon monitoring at construction sites? Have you found any other tools that will help you be a more effective site safety manager? What other “tools” would you like that would help you monitor airborne contaminants?
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Topics: General EHS, Construction H&S, Air Monitoring, Occupational Safety, Greenlight, Air Sampling, environmental air monitoring, perimeter air monitoring

The Triangle Shirtwaist Fire (1911) - A Turning Point for Workplace Safety

Posted by Shivi Kakar

Mar 23, 2011 3:39:09 PM

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Topics: OSHA, health and safety, General Industry H&S, OSHA Compliance, General EHS, Construction H&S, Emergency Response, H&S Training, worker safety, Occupational Health, Occupational Safety, regulation, Fire Safety, shirtwaist, fire, triangle

You Better be Qualified if You are a Respiratory Protection Program Administrator!

Posted by Shivi Kakar

Mar 21, 2011 2:31:48 AM

by Paula Kaufmann

What’s the job of a Respiratory Protection Program (RPP) Administrator? 


This individual is officially listed in the site’s written Respiratory Protection Program and is accountable and responsible for the day-to-day operation of the program. Some of those “day-to-day” tasks include

  • Maintaining the site Respiratory Protection Program

  • Assessing the workplace for potential respiratory hazards

  • Defining worker exposure for these hazards

  • Selecting appropriate respirators to provide protection from defined hazards

  • Ensuring

    • Medical evaluations are conducted of employees required to wear respirators PRIOR to fit testing

    • Respirators are fit tested for all required users

    • Proper use of respirators during routine and emergency operations

    • Respirators are appropriately cleaned, disinfected, stored, inspected, repaired, discarded, and maintained

    • Adequate air quality air is supplied if supplied air respirators are used.

    • Respirator users are trained in respiratory hazards, and the proper use and maintenance of respirators

    • Periodical evaluation of the Respiratory Protection Program implementation

    • Workers who voluntarily wear respirators (excluding filtering facepieces) comply with the medical evaluation, and cleaning, storing and maintenance requirements of the standard

    • All voluntary-use respirator users understand Appendix D of the standard




Yes, these incessant and critical health and safety tasks can be quite overwhelming!  What’s the big deal? For the company or job site or administrator who does not understand why a qualified and empowered RPP Administrator is a big deal, here is a triple-play of Top 5 facts that illustrate the importance of qualified training for Respiratory Protection Program Administrators!

Top 5 OSHA Violation!


Did you know that the Respiratory Protection Standard was in the Top 5 most frequently cited standards by OSHA compliance officers last year?  Why be a part of that statistic?  More about 2010’s Top 10 cited violations can be found in a recent EHSwire blog by Emilcott’s Sarah Damaskos.

Top 5 Reasons YOU need to be “Qualified”



  1. Workers at your site are required to wear respirators for protection from respiratory hazards – and you selected these respirators.

  2. You train respirator users on how to put on and take off their respirator – along with the limitations on their use, and their maintenance.

  3. Implementation of the site respiratory protection program (which you wrote) is just another one of your jobs!

  4. Airline (atmosphere-supplying) respirators are used at your site – and you make sure that an adequate air supply, quantity, and flow of breathing air is available.

  5. You coordinate the medical evaluation of employees who must use respirators.


Top 5 OSHA Compliance Indicators!


If you get a visit from an OSHA Compliance Safety and Health Officer, they review these essential factors to help determine if the Respiratory Protection Program Administrator is “Qualified”:

  1. The written Respiratory Protection Program and interviews with the program administrator reveal an understanding of the familiarity with the respirator standard, site respiratory hazards, and the use of the respirators in the workplace.

  2. Respiratory fit testing is conducting annually or at assignment and the program administrator maintains.

  3. Hazardous airborne contaminants that employees may inhale have been identified.  Reasonable estimates of employee exposures were used in determining the appropriate respirator for employees to use.

  4. Recent changes in the workplace such as new processes have been evaluated for necessary respiratory program changes

  5. The program administrator keeps a written assessment of the program operations and implements changes that may be considered as efforts toward improvement.


How to Become a Qualified RPP Administrator


Focused, hands-on training with experienced health and safety instructors can make the difference for a Respiratory Protection Program Administrator – clarifying the waters by understanding the objectives of the law and how it applies to each work site!

As Health and Safety consultants to many types of companies, Emilcott staff are on job sites each day and see health and safety violations such respirators perched on foreheads or tissues jammed in the sides to ensure a bitter fit. Are these problems an employee violation or a company-wide result of not understanding the importance of a competent Administrator who can develop, maintain and enforce a respirator protection program that reduces occupation risk?

In these cases, we conduct urgent and immediate on-site RPP Administrator training that often includes high level managers to ensure that there is a top to bottom understanding of the importance of proper respirator usage. In addition to our private training, the Emilcott Training Institute offers public enrollment Respiratory Protection Program Administrator training courses in two formats:  an intense 3-hour course with a small class size and an in-depth two-day course.  In both classes, students learn the level of information required for their sites and are taught by an experienced H&S instructor that can answer questions. 

So if you are unfamiliar with your required duties as an RPP Administrator or you want a better understanding of how to encourage better respirator usage by your site personnel, look around for an effective RPP Administrator training class. Once complete and in practice, you should dicover aTop 5 list that looks more like this:

  1. OSHA respirator inspection passed without any problems, fines or additional action.

  2. Site personnel actively wear their respirators – the way that they are supposed to!

  3. Site workers reinforce the importance of respirator use to their colleagues (even when you’re not around)!

  4. Managers understand the need for respirator use and support related site activities such as testing of hazardous airborne contaminants.

  5. Written assessments of program changes are treated as a necessity for business to move forward rather than resented.


You ARE a Qualified Respiratory Protection Program Administrator!

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Topics: Emilcott, OSHA, Personal Protective Equipment, health and safety, General Industry H&S, OSHA Compliance, General EHS, Construction H&S, Emergency Response, H&S Training, Compliance, worker safety, Occupational Health, Occupational Safety, Lab Safety & Electrical, emergency response training, Fire Safety, Exposure, Respiratory, Occupational Training, RPP, respirator protection program, administrator

Need a Paradigm Shift with Safety Attitudes at your Manufacturing Site? Try OSHA 10-Hour Outreach Training for General Industry

Posted by Shivi Kakar

Mar 7, 2011 1:13:18 AM

Martha Hernandez

When it comes to training, OSHA takes it seriously. With good reason:  training keeps workers safe and reduces incidents.  Many OSHA standards specifically require the employer to train employees in the safety and health aspects of their jobs. Other OSHA standards require the employer to make sure that only certified, competent, or qualified workers are assigned specific tasks--meaning that they have had special previous training.  OSHA compliance officers look to see that employers have provided appropriate training to their employees.  

In an effort to improve the consistency of the quality and content of health and safety training, OSHA has developed a series of “Outreach” training programs.  OSHA Outreach training focuses on segments of labor in the business sectors of General Industry and Construction and Maritime Industries. The courses are either 10 or 30 hours in duration with strict agenda guidelines containing focused and topical material, and must be taught by instructors that have extensive training and are approved to deliver the instruction.  The instructors or “Authorized Providers” must attend OSHA train-the-trainer courses, adhere to rigorous standards, and are subject to unannounced audits by OSHA at any time.  Over 3.2 million workers have participated in this type of training over the last 5 years!

In today’s blog we will look at the General Industry Outreach Training.

What is General Industry Outreach Training?


“General Industry” is defined by OSHA as any industry not directly involved with agriculture, construction, and maritime industries.  The standards applicable to General Industry are contained in Section 29 of the Code of Regulations, Part 1910.  As a result of the broad “General Industry” definition, one of the most popular OSHA Outreach courses is the 10-hr General Industry Training  which teaches safety and health hazard recognition and prevention.   OSHA Outreach training focuses on segments of labor in the business sectors of General Industry and Construction and Maritime Industries.

Who Should Attend a 10-hour General Industry Training Course?


The OSHA 10-hour General Industry course is designed for plant superintendents and engineers, floor foremen, safety professionals, project managers, and any other personnel responsible for workplace safety. Indeed, many organizations include all their plant personnel in this training because EVERYONE is responsible for safety. This course is an excellent introduction to health and safety programs for new employees or when it is time to create a paradigm shift in attitudes about safety at a facility.  The General Industry course can help line management get “safety religion”!  In fact, OSHA recognizes the completion card as an indication of the importance of safety and health at an organization.  Workers’ Compensation insurance providers often will reduce rates for companies that provide this training to their staff.

Emilcott’s OSHA 10-Hour General Industry Course


Based on the firm guidelines provided by OSHA, Emilcott’s 10-hour General Industry course provides important information about how OSHA is involved in the general industry community and how employees can recognize and control common workplace hazards. The training focuses on recognizing and controlling hazards found in the industrial workplace. It assumes no prior training nor requires prerequisite training. Much of our 10-hr General Industry course is interactive and hands-on.  More importantly, our courses are taught by instructors with real-world experience. Credentials and certifications provide a way to verify competency in particular fields but real-world experience should not be discounted. It’s one thing to talk about electrical hazards, it’s quite another to actually work around them. This experience allows our trainers to put the material in perspective and helps students make the connection between theory and practice.

Quality Training Makes a Difference


We have found that the OSHA Outreach Courses for both Construction and General Industry help site management really “get it” when it comes to site safety!  This training has given new life to existing safety programs and initiatives at our client sites.  Have you seen safety training make a difference is program compliance at your sites?
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Topics: Emilcott, OSHA, health and safety, General Industry H&S, OSHA Compliance, General EHS, H&S Training, Compliance, worker safety, Occupational Health, Occupational Safety, General Industry, Occupational Training

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